Summertime with the Jug

bikes outside the jugIt’s hard not to associate the Jug with summer —  especially with FIBArk and other festivals that happen downtown. Since the Jug is across the street from Riverside Park it’s in the heart of the action. But, of course, we see evidence of the Jug everywhere. Happy summer!

This is the place to be.

This is the place to be.

Part of the landscape.

Part of the landscape.

FIBArk — the mark of summer in Salida.

FIBArk — the mark of summer in Salida.

Ferris wheel fun

Ferris wheel fun during FIBArk.

Boaters doing their thing during FIBArk.

Boaters doing their thing during FIBArk.

Catching air.

Catching air.

Catching fish.

Catching fish.

Two registers! Double time.

Two registers! Double time.

Always service with a smile or a crazy look.

Always service with a smile or a crazy look.

Waiting in the shade

Waiting in the shade

Raise your can.

Raise your can.

Busy good times. ,

Busy good times. ,

 

Calm waters.

Calm waters.

Mike Potts kicking back on a summer float

Mike Potts kicking back on a summer float

Dan Zettler — real men do wear pink.

Dan Zettler — real men do wear pink..

Keeping good company.

Keeping good company.

Cheers.

Cheers.

Summertime in Salida.

Summertime in Salida.

Advertisements

Shot glasses for the Masses

300px-Great_train_robbery_still

Two scowling outlaws lift their whiskey-filled shot glasses while staring each other down in a dusty saloon. Silent patrons watch as the gunslingers flick the liquor from the glasses into their mouths while still looking eye to eye.

After slamming the glasses back down on the bar, they both move their hands slowly to their sides where they both rest their fingers on the holsters. “How ‘bout we take this outside, pardner,” one of them says.

According to gunslinging procedures, generally, outlaws consume shots and then fire them during a gunfight — at least in Wild West movies.

220px-Cocktail_1988

Or in another movie scene, we’ve got cocky, pre-kooky Tom Cruise igniting shot glasses brimming with neon liquor before he slides them down the bar to amply endowed female customers who gush over his bartending bravado. And, as always, the camera zooms in for a shot of the shots.

What would these classic movie scenes be without the shot glasses? The “Hangover” would have been just another average day if Stu, Alan, Phil and Doug hadn’t clinked and downed their roofie spiked shot glasses of Jagermeister.

Hangoverposter09

It’s not just Hollywood that touts the shot glass. These receptacles have been practical and popular in mainstream society for decades. They are collected as souvenirs by travelers and cradled by inebriated college kids around the country.

Continue reading

Here’s to the “Bourbon Legend”

© Decatur Wine & Spirits

© Decatur Wine & Spirits

Bourbon whiskey is pretty much badass. Not only is it uniquely an American spirit, but it also has been known, historically, to suppress coughs, add flavor to other liquors and beers, and not to mention, its distilleries were used to produce penicillin. Bourbon also made a guest appearance on Star Trek as Captain Kirk and Spock downed the amber liquid during a Wild West gunfight episode.

Its origin

Back in the1700’s, Scottish and Irish immigrants, who were also pretty B.A., began making whiskeys and distilling bourbon in Bourbon, Kentucky, which, ironically is mistakenly thought to be a dry county today (shipcompliantblog.com). A popular saying: “You can get a drink in Christian County but not in Bourbon County,” has led to this bourbon legend. Actually, Bourbon is a “wet” county, but no longer has any operating bourbon distilleries.

Painting by Emanuel Leutze

Painting by Emanuel Leutze

Supporting the troops

When the British were putting a halt to importing sugar and molasses, which were key for Rum production, colonists began to make bourbon instead.

Soldiers greatly appreciated it and took to bourbon during the Revolutionary War (sexcigarsbooze).

Medicinal magic (or so we thought)

In the 1800’s and into the earlier 1900’s, doctors also liked the smooth aspect of bourbon in terms of a cough suppressant. They often prescribed it — even to children. In fact, bourbon was such a popular way to treat coughs and sore throats that it was the only liquor, along with other whiskies and sacramental wine, that was legal from 1920-1933 during Prohibition. However, you had to have a doctor’s prescription to get the “Medical Bourbon.”

Today, doctors do not recommend alcohol as medicine, pointing out that it causes dehydration. Despite warnings from the medical community, people still make bourbon Hot Toddies to combat a cough and throat tickle. Additionally, in general, many people like the warming effect bourbon brings on.

“It definitely gives you a really warm rush throughout your body. It really warms you up; that’s why it’s a winter drink,” says bourbon fan Alison Manthey.

“I totally understand why the men with the funny little Scotty hats sat at the bar and sipped whiskey in Ireland when it was freezing and cold,” she adds.

Continue reading